Remote Services

Like many small businesses, we recognize that for the safety of our team members and clients, we must adjust our business practices during this time. In light of these events, we’d like to announce a list of adapted, remote services to better serve the preservation field during the global COVID-19 pandemic. Unlike our usual reports, these services are offered and priced individually. 

The times are hard. While we love being on the ground and visiting your cities, social distancing holds us back. Since travel is not an option right now, our adapted, remote services provide a succinct analysis from our home to yours. If your organization has wanted to measure the impact of historic preservation in your city, this is your opportunity to get targeted research on the most pressing issue in your community.

 

We will be offering remote analysis on: 

Property Value Assessment of Historic Districts versus Rest of the City

This analysis is contingent on the client providing local property assessment data of at least 10 years of data, HD shapefiles, parcels, and photos.
We’ll provide: 
  • Analysis of the change in property values comparing the areas of the city that fall in a local, conservation, or National Register district versus the rest of the city. 
  •  A report presenting the findings clearly and effectively in a graphically appealing format that can be understood by academics, economists, mayors, city council members, property owners, and local stakeholders alike.

Click here to download an example of what this property value analysis would look like: Property Value Template – Saratoga Springs Example

Demographics, Jobs, and Businesses in Historic Districts 

This analysis is contingent on the client providing HD shapefiles, parcels, and photos.
We’ll provide: 
  • Analysis of the composition of demographic data, jobs, and businesses in historic districts compared to the rest of the city. 
  •  A report presenting the findings clearly and effectively in a graphically appealing format that can be understood by academics, economists, mayors, city council members, property owners, and local stakeholders alike.

Contribution of Older Building Stock to Affordable Housing

This analysis is contingent on the client providing local property assessment data of at least 10 years of data, building permit data, HD shapefiles, parcels, and photos.
We’ll provide: 
  • Analysis of the older building stock in your city and what role it plays in meeting the needs of affordable housing. Includes information on the location, condition, and ownership patterns of these older housing units, which are vulnerable to demolition, etc. 
  • Brief overview of US  tools, strategies, and incentives to keep more older housing units on the market. 
  • A report presenting the findings clearly and effectively in a graphically appealing format that can be understood by academics, economists, mayors, city council members, property owners, and local stakeholders alike.

Cost of an Empty Building

This analysis contingent on the client providing localized commercial rent levels. 
We’ll provide: 
  • Localized analysis on the costs of an empty building. 
  • A report presenting the findings clearly and effectively in a graphically appealing format that can be understood by academics, economists, mayors, city council members, property owners, and local stakeholders alike.

Impact of Upper Floor Housing 

This analysis is contingent on the client providing localized residential rent levels. 
We’ll provide: 
  • Localized analysis on the economic impacts of upper floor housing/new housing units. 
  • A report presenting the findings clearly and effectively in a graphically appealing format that can be understood by academics, economists, mayors, city council members, property owners, and local stakeholders alike.

Other Historic District Analysis by Request

We will also be hosting a webinar series starting April 28th. Topics to include: 

The Contribution of Older Housing to Affordable Housing in the U.S. and San Antonio ($25 through Ticco) 

The United States is in a housing affordability crisis. Preservationists have argued for years that utilizing older (re: not necessarily “historic”) housing stock must be a central component of any affordable housing strategy. Until now, the research did not exist to advocate on behalf of older housing as a source of affordable housing. Join in for this webinar to hear about PlaceEconomics’ exciting new research from San Antonio, Texas on the role that older housing plays in meeting the needs of San Antonians in general, and households of modest income in particular. We will also discuss approaches to keep more existing housing units available for sale and for rent as well as strategies for communicating the importance of preserving our existing building stock to elected officials and policy makers. Register here.

The following webinars will be offered individually or as a series. The price per webinar is $40 for each or $120 for all four.

24 Reasons Historic Preservation is Good for your Community

Historic preservation is under attack in many cities in the US. The motivations of the critics vary, from the ideological to anti-regulatory zealotry to the mistaken to the simply greedy. Over the last five years PlaceEconomics has done analyses of the impacts of historic preservation in nearly a dozen cities of all sizes throughout the United States. We’ve looked at the numbers, spoken to the communities, and seen for ourselves–historic preservation is good for communities. From that research we’ve assembled the twenty-four reasons why historic preservation is good for your city. Register here. 

Date: May 13, 11 am PST  / 2 pm EST

Preservation Incentives, Tools, and Strategies: What We’ve Learned

Not even the richest countries in the world have enough resources and political will to preserve all the buildings that merit it. PlaceEconomics has completed policy development assignments in Raleigh, Nashville, Miami-Dade County, and Abu Dhabi (UAE). Come learn why preservation incentives are good public policy, what makes them most effective, and hear about innovative strategies for preservation used all over the world. Register here.

Date: May 27, 11 am PST  / 2 pm EST

Historic Urban Landscape Framework and Historic Preservation

In 2011, the UNESCO General Conference adopted the Historic Urban Landscape approach for the management of historic cities. UNESCO describes the HUL as moving “beyond the preservation of the physical environment and focuses on the entire human environment with all of its tangible and intangible qualities. It seeks to increase the sustainability of planning and design interventions by taking into account the existing built environment, intangible heritage, cultural diversity, socio-economic and environmental factors along with local community values.” PlaceEconomics and our sister company Heritage Strategies International have been using the HUL approach to frame our recommendations for policies, strategies, tools, and incentives for heritage conservation. This session will describe the HUL, identify the tools framework, and give examples of how our recommendations have been incorporated into this international protocol. Register here.

Date: June 10, 11 am PST  / 2 pm EST

Heritage and Resiliency 

Resiliency demands a holistic view of the city–it looks far beyond hazard mitigation or adaptation planning and attempts to understand the city as a series of interdependent systems. The ability to adapt and grow despite the chronic stresses of high unemployment, poverty, or lack of social cohesion is as core to the concept of resiliency as is planning for the next hurricane.  It is through this holistic and systemic lens that the case can be made for the contribution of heritage to resiliency and sustainable development. The many goals of a resilient city– improved quality of life and well-being for citizens, stable job growth and economic prosperity, social cohesion and a sense of collective identity–are already fostered by historic preservation. By many measures, historic preservation is, in and of itself, sustainable development. Planning or development without a historic preservation component is not sustainable. Just as resiliency is not limited to disaster preparation, sustainable development is more than “green buildings.”  While closely related, “resiliency” and “sustainable development” are not synonyms. Perhaps the best distinction between the two is this: Where sustainability aims to put the world back into balance, resilience looks for ways to manage an imbalanced world. Historic preservation is a field uniquely equipped to manage change, and for this reason must be considered an integral component if any resiliency strategy. Register here. 

Date: June 24, 11 am PST  / 2 pm EST

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